Clean India campaign on wrong track

UNDERLINING waste problem as a “serious public health threat”, Niti Aayog’s Draft Three-Year Action Agenda of April 2017, plans to set up 100 waste-to-energy (WTE) plants to deal with 1,70,000 tons per day of municipal solid waste for some 7,935 urban centres. It draws on the May 2014 report of the Planning Commission’s Task Force on WTE and recommendations in the October 2015 report of the Sub-Group of Chief Ministers on Clean India Mission, which recommended WTE plants for bigger municipalities and clusters of municipalities. The Action Agenda states “Incineration or ‘waste to energy’ is the best option” even as Annexure A of the Kyoto Protocol marks out waste incineration as a source of greenhouse gases. This Protocol remains relevant because the Paris Agreement on climate crisis will come into operation only from 2021. Read more

Courtesy: The Tribune

Mining children are nobody’s baby in Govt of India, ministry and laws are quiet on child rights, says representation

Raising a major policy issue, a top advocacy group, Mines, Minerals and People (MM&P) has regretted that the plight of the “mining children” is not the responsibility of the Ministry of Mines, Government of India, which looks after all the mines in India, and the result is a strange “mess”: the lives of children as a result of mining has to be addressed by other departments like child welfare, education, tribal welfare, labour, environment and others. Read more

Courtesy: Counterview

Deep pits found, illegal mining of red sand alleged

With construction activity picking up across the district and new roads being laid, the menace of illegal sand mining has once again reared its head.

Months after The Hindu reported about illegal mining at Cheryal, similar allegations have surfaced at Dasugadd Tanda, barely 15 km from the district headquarters.

Just about a kilometre from Sangareddy-Narsapur road, one has to take a left turn and travel for some distance to see new chasms that run so deep that two-storey buildings could be buried in them. Digging of red sand, a crucial component in construction, has been taking place over past few months, but officials are allegedly looking the other way. Read more

Courtesy: The Hindu

Illegal mining: OMC to pay Rs 2,100 cr

The State-run Odisha Mining Corporation (OMC) would pay a penalty of over Rs 2,100 crore by December 30 while implementing the Supreme Court’s order on illegal mining.

The apex court has set the payment date by December 31, which is a Sunday; so, the OMC would deposit the money by next Saturday in the accounts of the Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) set up for the purpose.

The SPV, Odisha Mineral Bearing Areas Development Corporation (OMBADC), has been set up to expedite developmental activities in the mining areas.

After the Supreme Court’s order, the State Government is expecting a total penalty collection of about Rs 17,575 crore towards violation of environment laws and another Rs 2,000 crore from violation of forest clearance, mining plan and operate to consent norms for all the erring mine leaseholders, including the OMC.

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Courtesy: the pioneer

Deep pits found, illegal mining of red sand alleged

With construction activity picking up across the district and new roads being laid, the menace of illegal sand mining has once again reared its head.

Months after The Hindu reported about illegal mining at Cheryal, similar allegations have surfaced at Dasugadd Tanda, barely 15 km from the district headquarters.

Just about a kilometre from Sangareddy-Narsapur road, one has to take a left turn and travel for some distance to see new chasms that run so deep that two-storey buildings could be buried in them. Digging of red sand, a crucial component in construction, has been taking place over past few months, but officials are allegedly looking the other way.

Read more

Courtesy: The Hindu

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